Yours, but not your gardens…

Momo and "her" sofa

I’m a self proclaimed dog person and as a recent article in the NY Times pointed out dogs and gardens are not necessarily best friends.  I know from personal experience that if I’ve handed off a nice raw bone and open the French door to the back yard there is going to be digging.  Fresh from the butcher is not as tasty as seasoned with dirt is what I’ve taken away from the observation.  Investigation to be done?  Any and all things green regardless of how established are fair game for trampling. Luck has played a part in nothing toxic being consumed.  Despite all we coexist, some days being a bit more chaotic than others.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/26/garden/26garden.html?_r=1&ref=garden

Mr. Martha Stewart

Just learned that Little Rock  has a Mr. Martha Stewart who goes by the name of P. Allen Smith.  The NY Times article  written by Kim Severson was accurate in stating that he’s, if you will an influential tastemaker that most people have not heard of.  A quick visit to YouTube provided more visuals.  I like the compost bin made out of a trash can how to.  It’s a simple and cheap project, thrifty if you’re trying to tone it down a bit.  Several years ago I ordered a fancy rotating compost bin that arrived in a box, that box being filled with multiple pieces.  A move, the loss of instructions and a seeming inability to manipulate large pieces of plastic has left me not with compost to amend my soil but potential landfill.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/05/garden/05smith.html?pagewanted=3&ref=garden

Only in New York…

Image courtesy of tmgonzalez on Flickr

I’ve been thinking about this article for a couple of weeks now.  Named before a location was found Brooklyn Grange is located on a 40,000 square foot rooftop in Queens.  A for profit farm that will provide veggies from a stand at the farm and to select restaurants.  What would have been amazing to watch was the setup,  a crane lifting endless bags of an engineered soil mix from street level to the roof.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/14/nyregion/14farm.html?ref=urban_agriculture

Topsy Turvy trends…

Upside down plants, the trend is still hanging on so to speak.  Not only are the infomercials going strong the New York Times had a recent article about the upside down vegetable garden.  According to this article over 20 million of these planters have been sold since its invention in 2005.  It seems like one of those things you either love or hate.  I’ve not tried this technique myself and my friend’s critique of the product having tried it last year in her backyard with tomato plants was something along the lines of  “They are crap.”   Should you not be a name brand gardener there are plenty of how to videos posted on YouTube utilizing soda bottles and buckets.  Given that I’ve thought about putting planting beds on the roof of my house I’m going to stay neutral on this topic.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/20/garden/20tomato.html?src=me&ref=general

Feed me Seymour…

I’m thinking that something like this might be the end result of the use of glyphosate, a weedkiller that goes by the name of Roundup.  It must be mentioned that Roundup was originally manufactured by the corporation I insist on ripping on and that would be Monsanto.  What’s happening is that weeds are becoming resistant to Roundup, sort of like the hearty cockroach.  Options are hand pulling (not likely if there is substantial acreage), plowing them under or yes you guessed it stronger chemicals.  The NY Times recently polled a group of individuals with such diverse opinions as “Actually the surprise would have been if these weeds didn’t show up – the only thing in doubt was the timing.”  Michael Pollan to “Glyphosate is the world’s greatest herbicide.”  Stephen Powles

http://roomfordebate.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/05/06/invasion-of-the-superweeds/

Give me a good rumor…

This article, a profile of Tony Avent and his Plants Delights nursery had me at twenty different lilacs.  A practical approach (he stopped using chemical fertilizer twenty years ago sparing the microbes in compost from getting burned) with spectacular variety.  Ah to have been ordering plants since age six.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/29/garden/29garden.html?pagewanted=1&ref=garden

If you wait long enough, it will all come back in fashion…

It’s true, the above statement.  I have vague memories of the popularity of grow your own mushroom kits in the mid to late 1970’s.  I think I even talked my parents into ordering one although in that era it was more about button than shiitake.  Without a purchase or request the poisonous variety sprout in my yard Fall and Winter…

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/15/garden/15mushrooms.html?ref=garden

I Ate This

“I Ate This” is a Flickr group with 19,000 members and approximately 300,000 images.  In other words, I am not alone in documenting food that I grow, food I make, food that is luxuriously made for me, shared food and food that my son Henry consumes. I have yet to document home made meals for our Akita Momotaro.  The NY Times strengthened my feeling of suspected community with a recent article about visual food documentation in many of its glorious forms.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/07/dining/07camera.html?scp=1&sq=pictures%20of%20food&st=cse

“In the unconscious mind, food equals love because food is our deepest and earliest connection with our caretaker,” said Kathryn Zerbe, a psychiatrist who specializes in eating disorders and food fixations at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland. “So it makes sense that people would want to capture, collect, catalog, brag about and show off their food.”

Quote from the article “First Camera, Then Fork” by Kate Murphy